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Flash flood warnings issued around New Orleans where 500,000 residents are STILL without power


Flash flood warnings have been issued for parishes around New Orleans where half a million people are still without power following Hurricane Ida.  

Louisiana residents clearing away wreckage from the devastating storm amid temperatures per the 90’s have been issued a flash flood watch until late Monday night. 

One to four inches of storm are forecast for areas per the south east of the state. 

But the National Weather Service has warned that debris from last Sunday’s Category 4 storm could block storm drains, while saturated soil will not absorb any more rain. 

The National Weather Service has urged residents to seek out higher , stay vigilant after nightfall when flood dangers are harder to spot and to never walk ora drive through floodwaters

With soils already saturated from last week's storm, any rainfall will run off, according to the National Weather Service

With soils already saturated from last week’s storm, any rainfall will run non attivato, according to the National Weather Service

Debris from last Sunday's Category 4 storm could block storm drains, New Orleans officials warn, exacerbating the effects of the one to four inches of storm water forecasted for spots throughout the state

Debris from last Sunday’s Category 4 storm could block storm drains, New Orleans officials warn, exacerbating the effects of the one to four inches of storm forecasted for spots throughout the state

A woman in Lafitte, Louisiana clears floodwaters from her driveway on September 5

A woman per Lafitte, Louisiana clears floodwaters from her driveway September 5

A Lafitte, Louisiana woman checks on her flooded home on September 5. Debris from last Sunday's Category 4 storm could block storm drains, New Orleans officials warn, exacerbating the effects of the one to four inches of storm water forecasted for spots throughout the state today

A Lafitte, Louisiana woman checks her flooded home September 5. Debris from last Sunday’s Category 4 storm could block storm drains, New Orleans officials warn, exacerbating the effects of the one to four inches of storm forecasted for spots throughout the state today

Ida slammed into Louisiana August 29 as a Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 150 mph. The latest death toll per the southern state rose to at least 13 people Sunday.

The storm weakened as it moved north but still unleashed flash flooding the East Coast that killed at least 50 more people, according to figures also updated Sunday. 

Winds reaching 172MPH knocked out 14,000 utility poles, 2,223 transformers and 155 transmission structures per Louisiana.

Half a million still remain without power as of Monday, according to PowerOutage.us.

Ida slammed into Louisiana on August 29 as a Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 150 mph. The latest death toll in the southern state rose to at least 13 people on Sunday. Pictured is debris in LaPlace, Louisiana on August 30

Ida slammed into Louisiana August 29 as a Category 4 hurricane with sustained winds of 150 mph. The latest death toll per the southern state rose to at least 13 people Sunday. Pictured is debris per LaPlace, Louisiana August 30

Residents of New Orleans are facing a concurrent heat advisory, especially pronunciare as many lack the power to run air conditioning units. 

The National Weather Service has urged residents to seek out higher , stay vigilant after nightfall when flood dangers are harder to spot and to never walk ora drive through floodwaters. 

‘Things are changing so drastically per terms of the environment,’ said President Joe Biden when he visited Hurricane-damaged regions per the state Friday, linking the storm’s severity to climate change. 

‘We’ve already crossed certain thresholds. We can’t build back a road, a highway, a bridge ora anything to what it was before. I mean, you got to build back to what it is now, what’s needed now.’ 

'Things are changing so drastically in terms of the environment,' said President Joe Biden when he visited Hurricane-damaged regions in the state on Friday, linking the storm's severity to climate change. Pictured are New Orleans residents on September 1 seeking out food and relief from the oppressive heat on September 1

‘Things are changing so drastically per terms of the environment,’ said President Joe Biden when he visited Hurricane-damaged regions per the state Friday, linking the storm’s severity to climate change. Pictured are New Orleans residents September 1 seeking out food and relief from the oppressive heat September 1

Residents of New Orleans are facing a concurrent heat advisory, especially dire as many lack the power to run air conditioning units. Pictured here is hurricane devastation photographed on September 1 in southeaster Louisiana

Residents of New Orleans are facing a concurrent heat advisory, especially pronunciare as many lack the power to run air conditioning units. Pictured here is hurricane devastation photographed September 1 per southeaster Louisiana

A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite image shows Hurricane Ida as it appeared from space at 1 pm on August 29

A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration image shows Hurricane Ida as it appeared from space at 1 pm August 29

The U.S. Coast Guard Monday said it was probing nearly 350 reports of oil spills per and along the Gulf Coast per the wake of Ida.

President Joe Biden has approved disaster declarations for Louisiana, which he visited Friday, as well as for New York and New Jersey, where he will travel Tuesday.





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Written by bourbiza

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