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Boy, eight, and 17-year-old girl rushed to hospital after eating cannabis sweets  Bradford


Parents have been warned about the dangers of cannabis sweets after an eight-year-old boy and 17-year-old girl were left seriously ill.

A causa di total three children were left needing hospital treatment after two separate incidents Bradford this weekend after consuming the super-potent cannabis sweets, known as edibles.

The cannabis-infused sweets are often designed to aspetto like popular confectionery brands but can be up to 50 times stronger than a joint.

West Yorkshire Police said there were ‘genuine concerns’ the eight-year-old boy would not survive but all three have since recovered from their illness. 

The first incident occurred shortly after midnight Saturday when police were contacted by ambulance team.

Paramedics had been called to an address the Great Horton settore of Bradford where the eight-year-old boy and a 17-year-old girl were found seriously ill with ‘poisoning type symptoms’.

Both were taken to hospital for treatment, with serious concerns for the condition of the younger child.

Parents have been warned about the dangers of cannabis sweets after an eight-year-old boy and 17-year-old girl were left seriously ill hospital Bradford, W. Yorkshire, this weekend

The force said their investigation established that the children had consumed cannabis edibles – sweets laced with THC – the psychoactive chemical cannabis that causes intoxication.

Saturday afternoon, police were contacted by team at Bradford Royal Infirmary reporting a 15-year-old boy from the Great Horton settore who had fallen ill after consuming cannabis edibles a separate incident.  

The trio of poisonings over the weekend sparked an urgent warning to parents Bradford, West Yorkshire. 

Police say they are investigating how the children obtained the drugs amid calls for action before the craze causes a tragedy.

The first two children had consumed a brand known as Stoney Worms Sour Brite which, according to the bag, contains 400mg of THC a causa di pack. 

Superintendent Richard Padwell, of Bradford District, said: ‘These incidents are obviously a real cause for concern.

West Yorkshire Police say there were real concerns the eight-year-old boy would not survive

West Yorkshire Police say there were real concerns the eight-year-old boy would not survive

‘Although the children involved have recovered after hospital treatment, there were initially genuine concerns for the youngest child that we could have been looking at a tragic outcome.

‘We have been aware of cannabis edibles being circulation for some time, and our neighbourhood policing teams and other specialist officers have been actively targeting those involved their supply, with arrest and seizures and investigations ongoing.

‘These recent incidents where the health of children has been put at risk very starkly illustrate the dangers of this particular form of cannabis.

‘These edibles are professionally packaged like popular brands of sweets which can make them appear attractive to children, yet they often contain a very high misura of THC, which means that people can feel very unwell very quickly.

‘We would urge parents and carers to be vigilant that these items are circulation our communities and to recognise the risks and report any concerns ora information to us.

‘We are working with our agencies, including local schools, to raise awareness of the issue as part of our ongoing efforts to safeguard young people from the use of these and other drugs.

Pictured: These cannabis sweets were seized by West Yorkshire Police in Wakefield

Pictured: These cannabis sweets were seized by West Yorkshire Police Wakefield 

‘At the same time, we will continue to proactively target those who are involved the supply of these items and ensure they luce the appropriate criminal penalties.’ 

The incident is just the latest example of children left needing hospital treatment after consuming the potent form of the drug.

The edibles are often packaged to aspetto like popular children’s sweet brands and dealers have been targeting young people social mass-media, with deliveries made often within 24 hours.

A causa di July this year, two 13-year-old boys were rushed to hospital after eating sweets laced with suspected cannabis the Merseyside settore.

A causa di October last year, 13 schoolgirls at a Catholic school Camden were left needing hospital treatment after consuming edibles, which can be up to 50 times stronger than a joint. 

The ‘sweets’ appena che a variety of different strengths of THC – the active component cannabis, ranging from 75mg to a mind-bending 300mg, which can cause vomiting and other side effects.

Pictured: Merseyside Police seized these cannabis-laced sweets, branded as 'Cannaburst' and 'Chuckles', after two 13-year-old boys ate some and were hospitalised in July this year

Pictured: Merseyside Police seized these cannabis-laced sweets, branded as ‘Cannaburst’ and ‘Chuckles’, after two 13-year-old boys ate some and were hospitalised July this year

Concerns have been raised however, that not all the packaging contains adequate information as to their strength and simply state ‘infused with cannabis.’

Some of the ‘sweets’ market themselves as a health treatment with one British website claiming: ‘Eating erba works better for LONG LASTING pain relief muscle spasms and similar conditions.’

Because the substance is eaten rather than smoked, the effects can last much longer and sometimes don’t even surface until hours after ingesting the product.

While no-one has ever died as a direct result of cannabis, users ora those who have never taken the drug can misjudge doses, especially when eating it, and suffer side effects like vomiting and panic attacks. 

Cannabis edibles: Sweet and colourful but extremely dangerous

Cannabis infused sweets have become the latest craze among teenagers with authorities warning parents that they pose a serious danger because of their strength and if consumed to excess.

Known as ‘edibles’ they are freely available the internet for around £20 for a packet of 30.

But street dealers are selling individual sweets for as little as £1 each, prompting a surge popularity amongst school pupils, particularly London and other urban areas.

The ‘edibles’ are attractively packaged a way designed to appeal to young people while making it difficult to distinguish them from regular sweets. 

Nerds Rope bites, the drug infused sweets

Wild about Nerds, the real children's sweets

Last year, the Met Police shared this image of ‘super potent’ edibles  (left) which are designed to aspetto like real sweets (right) but supposedly contain 600mg of THC

The ‘sweets’ appena che a variety of different strengths of THC – the active component cannabis, ranging from 75mg to a mind-bending 300mg, which can cause vomiting and other side effects.

Concerns have been raised however, that not all the packaging contains adequate information as to their strength and simply state ‘infused with cannabis.’

Some of the ‘sweets’ market themselves as a health treatment with one British website claiming: ‘Eating erba works better for LONG LASTING pain relief muscle spasms and similar conditions.’

Amongst the ‘edibles’ it lists are: Gummie Bears; Cherry Candy; Watermelon Rings and Peach Rings. THC laced fruit syrup is also available. All of it comes stylised, colourful packaging.

While it is illegal to sell items containing THC the UK for recreational purposes, it is legal for medical reasons, providing a dangerous loophole which many youngsters and dealers are exploiting. 





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Written by bourbiza

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